Image for post
Image for post
By Daria Sheveleva via Unsplash

Many European museum collections contain artefacts, taken from former (mostly African) colonies. In recent years, museums of former colonial powers are met with increasing demands to return the looted heritage to their countries of origin. The movement for the decolonisation of cultural heritage has advanced the furthest in France, where the president Emmanuel Macron ordered the inauguration of the committee for restitution.

According to a committee member Felwine Sarr, almost two-thirds of over 90,000 African objects in French museums, are obtained during the colonial period. Many African countries, have already made lists of looted items and submitted claims for restitution. …


Image for post
Image for post
By Keith Haring via Artsy

Line art encompasses all artworks that employ lines on (mostly) blank background, to depict two or three-dimensional objects. Line artists use clean, bold lines without tones or shading to convey ideas, messages, and emotions.

Most commonly, line art is monochromatic, with black lines painted on a white surface. However, with the development of a genre, new, more colorful artworks appeared, skillfully mixing colors to redefine the traditional comprehension of line art.

Line art is one of the oldest art types out there, with first line art cave drawings dating 73,000 years backs. Needless to say, line art has drastically evolved since. …


Image for post
Image for post
by Oladimenji Odunsi via Unsplash

Despite its long and profuse tradition, even today the art of Africa remains mostly misunderstood and overlooked outside of the continent. Many people find it hard to relate to African representations of social status, beauty, spirituality, and ethics, so distinct from what we are used to seeing in the Western world. Today, we’ll try to bring traditional African art a bit closer to you, by explaining some of its key elements and ideas.

Let’s start by mentioning that African art is a very broad and versatile term that’s usually used to describe art made in the sub-Saharan region. …


Image for post
Image for post
via Unsplash

As humans, we often seek deeper meaning and balance in our lives. Yet only some of us make it in our endeavour. Today, we will discuss two Japanese life principles of Wabi-Sabi and Ikigai, whose goal is to teach us how to make the most of what we have and leave life to the fullest. Ikiɡai is there to help us find our true calling in life, while wabi-sabi can help us embrace the decay that comes with ageing, make peace with the things we cannot change, and enjoy our imperfect lives.

Wabi-Sabi

The Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi teaches us to appreciate the serenity that comes with ageing, that leaves marks on objects and humans alike. While “wabi” connotes understated elegance of asymmetric and unbalanced items, “sabi” translates into “to rust” and it celebrates the transience of life. The wabi symbolises the imperfections of objects that come from the limitations of design or manufacturing, while sabi reminds us of the mortality of everything, including ourselves. Wabi-sabi teaches us that nothing is perfect, to begin with, and that everything deteriorates with age. That’s why the wabi-sabi aesthetic favours imperfect, asymmetrical design, and items that carry the marks of a long existence of extended use. …


Image for post
Image for post
via Unsplash

Originating from China, feng shui is the ancient “art of placement” that helps individuals find balance with their surroundings. The basic goal of feng shui is to harmonize chi (also spelled qi) energy that is composed of the female (yin) and male (yang) principle, as the life source of all living matter. This energy flows through the world by wind (feng) and water (shui). When interrupted, it can bring problems in every area of your life. …


Image for post
Image for post
by Robert Zunikoff via Unsplash

Every art enthusiast knows that art can be made of anything — paint and canvas, bronze and ceramics, ink, computer pixels, or a combination of materials. Art created by combining different media or materials is called mixed media art. Favorite among the daring, revolutionary artists, mixed media art can combine sculptures and paintings with photographs, woodblocks, or found objects, to bring the art as we know it to new heights.

Although examples of mixed media art can be traced back to antique times, Pablo Picasso is considered to be the father of the genre. …


Image for post
Image for post
Via Unsplash

Have you ever desired a fantastic artwork, that you simply couldn’t afford? If so, this blog post is for you. Just because an art piece is above your price range, doesn’t mean you should immediately give up on it. There are many methods you can use to trim down the price and make sure it fits into your budget. Here are a few tips on how you can reduce the price of art, ranging from negotiating a discount to art commissions.

Discounts

Unexperienced art buyers are often reluctant to inquire about a discount. However, if you are unable to afford a full price, you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for a small reduction. Many galleries even expect a bit of negotiating. After all, it’s better to sell an art piece with a discount than not to sell it at all. Keep in mind, however, that discounts rarely cross a 10% threshold, particularly for first-time buyers. …


Image for post
Image for post

The value of art spans way beyond its aesthetic qualities. We already wrote about how art can help us change society and our own state of mind. But art can also be used as a tool to improve our emotional intelligence (our understanding of ourselves) and our cultural intelligence (understanding of other cultures, their values, philosophies, and meanings). Art is a tool for communication that enables people from different times and different cultures to convey messages via depictions, stories, or sounds. In this blog post, we’ll show you a few ways how art (painting, photography, fashion, poetry, etc.) …


Image for post
Image for post
Via Widewalls

When coronavirus effectively closed most museums and galleries, art collectors and enthusiasts were forced to satisfy their need for art online. Even now, when art venues are slowly opening up, there are more online viewing rooms and virtual tours, than ever. Now that we are all accustomed to viewing art online, maybe it’s a good time to remember that there is a type of art that was made to be seen on the screens all along. Video art uses moving images to challenge concepts of time, space, and form, and explore the qualities of the medium itself.


Image for post
Image for post
Dan Flavin via The Cut

Sometimes it’s a square on a blank surface. Other times it’s a set of carefully arranged neon lights or metal cubes placed on the gallery floor. Regardless of the form, minimalist art often confuses people, who question its meaning and relevancy. Simple and unpretentious, often made of industrial materials, minimalist art baffles the viewers, who often wonder why exactly, are these “lines and cubes” even considered art. In this blog post, we’ll help you understand all those puzzling art pieces, so you can enjoy the aesthetics of minimalism, just as much as we do.

About

Art Acacia | LEVEL

Online Art Gallery: artacacia.com | Art Talks: different-level.com

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store